AR Collaborative: World Book Talk Tips & Project Letter

#WorldBookTalk Channel

Welcome to the AR Collaborative: A World Book Talk.  I’m including a parent letter below for any school or classroom wishing to participate.  The informational letter provides key details of the project and allows parents the option of opting out of the video submission portion of the World Book Talk.  Click the link below to print a Project Letter PDF:

World Book Talk Project Letter

Who:     Students, teachers, principals, authors, grandparents; anyone that loves reading!

What:    Record a 60 second book talk video of your favorite book.  Any book you’ve read will do.

Where:   Send book talk videos along with a clear photo of the book’s cover to i35collaboration@gmail.com

When:    We are launching the AR Collaborative now.  Feel free to e-mail your videos anytime.

Why:      To foster a lifelong appreciation of reading while modeling meaningful technology integration.  Book talks also activate students’ prior knowledge and help them make important connections to a text.

Top 10 Book Talk Tips:

  1. Speak loudly and be clear while creating your 60 second video.
  2. The target audience is PreK – 12 students.
  3. Be creative & have fun.  Your audience will sense your passion for the book and its theme.
  4. Mention the title and author during your book talk.
  5. Students creating videos should only mention their first name.
  6. The beginning of your book talk video should include a “hook” or attention grabber.
  7. If you have a special connection to the book or author you could mention that.
  8. Plan your closing in advance so it’s clear and keeps potential readers interested.
  9. Book talks help readers make decisions about what to read; do not give away your book’s ending.
  10. Please remember to keep videos to 60 seconds or less.
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About Dr. Brad Gustafson

I am an elementary principal and author in Minnesota. You can connect with me at www.BradGustafson.com or on Twitter via @GustafsonBrad

Posted on October 18, 2013, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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